Clinician's Corner Blog

A PHCoE blog series written by leaders, clinicians and experts on current topics of interest for psychological health care providers in the Military Health System.

  • Female Service Members and Their Mental Health May 15, 2017

    I’ve been working for the military for over 30 years in many different roles. While my gender makes me obviously different from my male counterparts, I’ve never focused on it as a barrier because my parents raised me to do my best, and to accomplish the goals I set in my mind and heart, regardless of my gender.  

    Early in my career, I broke into the previously gender-restricted missile operations career field. That experience strongly shaped my perspective, and throughout my career has caused me to think about the challenges for military females.

  • OASIS Residential PTSD Treatment: It Does Exist! May 10, 2017

    Do you have active-duty patients who require more intensive PTSD treatment than you can provide? Have you had patients complain that they couldn’t do treatment assignments because of work or home responsibilities, despite sincere motivation? Do you have PTSD patients who are resistant to psychotherapy groups because the other patients “won’t understand” them? Have you had patients who required residential PTSD treatment but whose command wouldn’t approve a Temporary Assigned Duty (TAD) to a civilian facility?

  • Essential Skills for Military Psychologists: 9 Tips for Communicating with Commands May 8, 2017

    Assessing and treating active-duty service members often requires interactions with commands. Per the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), medical information may be disclosed to commands in a variety of circumstances necessary for safety, fitness for duty determinations and mission requirements. Read more about the military command exception of HIPAA.

  • Managing Suicide Risk and Access to Firearms: Guidelines for Providers May 1, 2017

    I have a patient who may be at risk for suicide and I know the patient owns a gun. What can I do?

    This is a great question and increasing safety in order to prevent suicide is vital. Increasing safety, or means restriction, in general, includes removal of any method by which a patient is considering a suicide attempt, however in the military the most pertinent factor is firearms.   

  • Let’s Talk About It! Use DHCC’s Mental Health Awareness Month Campaign in Your Commands and Clinics April 26, 2017

    May is Mental Health Awareness Month. Mental health providers working in military clinics and/or who are embedded into military commands have a unique vantage point to influence mental health knowledge and help-seeking behaviors among service members. One way to facilitate this is through a mental health outreach effort. Deployment Health Clinical Center (DHCC), through Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE), conducts an awareness campaign each year during the month of May.

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The views expressed in Clinician's Corner blogs are solely those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Psychological Health Center of Excellence or Department of Defense.